Climate change, education, forest management – Oregon candidates answer key questions

Every candidate on Oregon’s ballot for governor was presented the same 15 questions. Read their unedited responses.

By: - Tuesday May 3, 2022 5:30 am

Climate change, education, forest management – Oregon candidates answer key questions

Every candidate on Oregon’s ballot for governor was presented the same 15 questions. Read their unedited responses.

By: - 5:30 am

Ballots have been set out for the vote-by-mail May 17 primary that includes Oregon governor. (Salem Reporter)

Ballots have been set out for the vote-by-mail May 17 primary that includes Oregon governor. (Salem Reporter)

The following Q&A was compiled by Oregon newsrooms collaborating to cover the 2022 governor’s race. Journalists across the state drafted the following 15 questions, which were distributed to candidates by the Agora Journalism Center at the University of Oregon. Responses are in the candidates’ own words and have been trimmed to the 300-word limit. Click on the “cards” to see how they responded to our questions on housing, crime, education, economy and environmental issues. The primary election is on May 17 and voting is underway.

How this project developed: Oregon Media Collaborative

Our stories may be republished online or in print under Creative Commons license CC BY-NC-ND 4.0. We ask that you edit only for style or to shorten, provide proper attribution and link to our web site.

Les Zaitz
Les Zaitz

Les Zaitz is a veteran editor and investigative reporter, serving Oregon for more than 45 years. He reported for The Oregonian for 25 years and owns community newspapers and a digital news service. He is a national SPJ fellow, two-time Pulitzer finalist, including for a lengthy investigation of Mexican drug cartels in Oregon and five-time winner of Oregon’s top investigative reporting award. He has investigated corrupt state legislators, phony charities, and an international cult that moved to Oregon, and the biggest bank failure in Oregon history. He also has been active in reforming the state’s public records law and was appointed by the governor to the Oregon Public Records Advisory Council. In his spare time, he operates a ranch nestled in a national forest, feeding horses and assorted animals.

MORE FROM AUTHOR